NFFD Probate

Dealing with Probate single-handedly can be overwhelming.

Finding that you have a massive Solicitor’s bill is heart-breaking, particularly when overcoming the grief of losing someone you love.

What is Probate?

The term ‘Probate’ is widely used to describe what happens to someone’s property, money and possessions – their estate – when they die. This is also known as ‘estate administration’ or ‘administering an estate’.

The process involved in Probate can be complex and time consuming. It involves things like:

  • Establishing exactly what the person who dies owned
  • Notifying government departments, like the Passport Office, DVLA and HMRC
  • Ensuring that all assets are held securely and protected from damage or theft
  • Preparing Inheritance Tax forms, calculating any tax due and ensuring payment
  • Dealing with online accounts belonging to the deceased
  • Applying for and obtaining the Grant of Representation from the Court
  • Identifying all those entitled to inherit from the estate
  • Closing bank accounts, collecting money due on the estate, selling property
  • Paying all debts, including Mortgages, Credit Cards and Loans
  • Finalising Income Tax for the deceased
  • Preparing estate accounts to the beneficiaries
  • Distributing the remainder of the estate to the beneficiaries

How Much Can Probate Cost?

Dealing with the estate administration and being responsible as the personal representative, is not only time consuming but also means that if you do something wrong, even unintentionally, then you can be personally liable and may have to put right any wrongdoing and settle any financial loss out of your own pocket.

Which is why many people choose to appoint a professional to act as their personal representative. However, this can prove to be VERY expensive. Many professionals will charge a percentage – usually around 2.5% -of the value of the estate, regardless of the amount of work required, or the complexity of the estate.

  • Estate Value
  • £325,000
  • £500,000
  • £750,000
  • £1,000,000+
  • Solicitor Fees*
  • £8,125 + VAT
  • £12,500 + VAT
  • £18,750 +VAT
  • £25,000 +VAT

*Based on Law Society’s fee recommendations to their members. Many charge more with various hidden extras.

NFFD Probate

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We have partnered with the National Federation of Funeral Directors

to help you save your family from huge probate expenses when you have passed away.

An alternative way to pay for these probate costs while removing ALL the stress and burden from your loved ones is by purchasing a NFFD Probate Arrangement. Just make one phone call to the NFFD and they take care of everything. 

How does National Federation of Funeral Directors Probate compare?

Estate Value:

Under £500,000

  • Solicitor Fees
  • £12,500
    + VAT
  • £12,500
    + VAT
  • Our Fees
  • Single –
    £3,250
  • Joint –
    £3,850

Estate Value:

£500,000 – £1,000,000

  • Solicitor Fees
  • £18,750
    +VAT
  • £18,750
    +VAT
  • Our Fees
  • Single –
    £3,850
  • Joint –
    £4,250

Estate Value:

£1,000,000 – £5,000,000

  • Solicitor Fees
  • From £25,000
    +VAT
  • From £25,000
    +VAT
  • Our Fees
  • Single –
    £4,250
  • Joint –
    £4,850

Estate Value:

£5,000,000 – £10,000,000

  • Solicitor Fees
  • From £125,000
    +VAT
  • From £125,000
    +VAT
  • Our Fees
  • Single –
    £5,250
  • Joint –
    £5,850

Estate Value:

Over £10,000,000

  • Solicitor Fees
  • 2.5% of Estate
    + VAT
  • 2.5% of Estate
    + VAT
  • Our Fees
  • Single –
    P.O.A
  • Joint –
    P.O.A

What are the differences between Single and Joint NFFD Probate?

Whether you opt for a Single or Joint NFFD Probate arrangement, you will have access to everything in the ‘What’s included?’ section. However, depending on your relationship status and type of ownership in your property, you need to ensure that you opt for the right solution to avoid any potential conflicts arising in the future.

Single NFFD Probate

Single NFFD Probate is for someone who is unmarried, widows and widowers, or a married couple that are ‘Tenants in Common’ regarding the ownership of their property.

A Single NFFD Probate arrangement includes full probate administration for the certificate holder only.

Please read this if you are married

If you and your spouse are Tenants in Common, meaning you both own a specified share in a property (most often 50% each), this will result in probate being required for both first and second deaths. In this case, you will require two Single NFFD Probate arrangements.

Joint NFFD Probate

Joint NFFD Probate is for the majority of a married couples that are ‘Joint Tenants’ in their property.

If you and you spouse are Joint Tenants, meaning you both own 100% of the property, probate will only be required upon second death. A Joint NFFD Probate arrangement will include guidance and assistance upon first death and then carrying out full Probate upon the death of the remaining spouse.

Please read this if you are married

If you and your spouse are Tenants in Common, meaning you both own a specified share in a property (most often 50% each), this will result in probate being required for both first and second deaths. In this case, you will require two Single NFFD Probate arrangements.

How do I know my type of ownership?

There is a plethora of ways to identify your type of ownership in a property. You can find out what type of joint ownership you have by checking documents such as a:

  • property transfer
  • property lease
  • trust deed, also known as a ‘declaration of trust’ (a document stating an owner’s share in a jointly owned property)

Alternatively, for a disbursement fee, the NFFD can perform a professional legal enquiry with HM Land Registry to identify your type of ownership in the property. This is the most conclusive way to determine your type of ownership as it is avoids the possibility of looking at outdated documentation that could give you incorrect information.

What’s Included?

  • Assisting your loved ones with registering the death.
  • Ensuring all assets are secure and protected during the probate process.
  • Advising your loved ones on the terms of your Will or the intestacy provisions and discuss the duties of the executors.
  • Identifying, valuing and collecting assets.
  • Calculating the Inheritance Tax, submitting to the HMRC and arranging payment.
  • Preparing estate accounts and distributing to your beneficiaries.
  • Ensuring relevant Inheritance Tax exemptions and reliefs are fully utilised.
  • Ensuring beneficiaries receive their full entitlement under your will or intestacy.
  • Corresponding with HMRC to finalise any income tax and capital gains matters.
  • Updating beneficiaries throughout.
  • Ensuring payment of your debts and liabilities.

What’s Not Included?

  • Dealing with any assets located outside of England and Wales.
  • Tracing missing or unknown beneficiaries.
  • Business or farming advice.
  • Dealing with any disputes or claims.
  • The beneficiaries’ personal taxation.
  • Dealing with any investigations by Government departments, such as HMRC or the benefits office.
  • Dealing with any assets located outside of England and Wales.
  • Tracing missing or unknown beneficiaries.
  • Business or farming advice.
  • Dealing with any disputes or claims.
  • The beneficiaries’ personal taxation.
  • Dealing with any investigations by Government departments, such as HMRC or the benefits office.

Get in touch today!